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This haunted mine is known for Mercury, Manganese, and creepy sh*t

This haunted mine is known for Mercury, Manganese, and creepy sh*t

The Horton Mine, found in the Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest in central Nevada, has earned a reputation after its closure that is as great as it ever was when it was in operation.

The Horton Mine has been in operation since the 1800s, and is part of the massive and sprawling Victorine Mine. It has been abandoned for years, but somewhere along the way it earned the reputation for being one of the most haunted mines in the United States – some even call it the most haunted mine in the world.

And given the number of deaths that have been recorded in mines over the years, that’s a long list to be on top of.

In a video recorded by the group “Exploring Abandoned Mines in CA, NZ, AZ,” the guy tasked with wandering through the Horton Mine manages to freak himself the F out.

He recorded two videos about a year apart, and the first one has some very bizarre moments. It’s tough to really accept when someone claims to have felt a sudden gust of cold or they get a bad feeling – even if they are being 100-percent genuine, there are always other explanations. When you see something start moving on its own though, well that’s a little tougher to write off.

Things get weird at the 2:35 mark. In the distance a chain begins to swing – and only a single chain, which negates the possibility of something bigger like a seismic event, or a nearby train causing it.

The other, perhaps more obvious answer is that someone swung it and ran away. That’s possible of course, but it doesn’t explain how it continues to swing for well over a minute. The chain doesn’t decrease in momentum either, which is also very odd. If there were a light weight on the bottom of the chain to make it into something of a pendulum, that might explain it. But there isn’t.

Check it out and keep reading.

I’ve read a few theories on how this could have happened from commenters online experts. Some say wind, but that’s improbable for a few reasons, including the depth of the cave, the movement of the chain, and the fact only one chain swings.

Another explanation is that the guy bumped in to it or there was an animal like a bat, but that wouldn’t explain how it swings with such precision or length of time. The same is true of a rock falling.

The guy filming the videos isn’t known for filming haunted locations. He explores abandoned mines and approaches them scientifically and rationally. After entering Horton Mines and fleeing due to a negative feeling, he decided to return and try again.

Check out the return video below. It has a moment that is weird, but there are a few rational explanations for it. It happens at the end, and it is an audio event, so turn up your speakers.

Part 2

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Founder and DBP boss. Ryan likes the Kansas Jayhawks, long walks on the beach, and high fiving unsuspecting people.
7 Comments
  1. Chris October 14, 2015 at 10:32 am

    Great post! Just the mine exploration was interesting, but that final audio event is freaky! Love your take on the paranormal. Keep it up!

    BTW… Heard about the site on Geek in the City

    Reply
  2. Anonymous September 22, 2016 at 8:03 pm

    as a mining historian from South Dakota i have been underground in at least a dozen. We have a couple of haunted ones in the Black Hills of South Dakota, but nothing as creepy as the Horton Mine.

    I have a trailer in the Nevada desert and with a couple of underground mining pros, we plan a visit to the Victorine/Horton.

    Tintonite

    Reply
    • Anonymous September 22, 2016 at 8:05 pm

      I forgot my name in the above comment Ken S.

      Reply
  3. Mary November 22, 2016 at 5:53 pm

    Ken. Can you let us know about your trip into the Horton when you go?

    Reply
  4. JonGee February 15, 2017 at 5:28 am

    I disagree, the chain seems to lose momentum. Also, it would be good to see the full video, just to show that when it gets edited at 2:17 he hasn’t just gone and swung the chain himself.

    On the second video, interesting feature at 2:49 on the lower left.

    Some suggest the transcript of the audio of the “radio” is:

    1st voice: “Mine control to Michael, are we clear to detonate?”
    2nd voice:”Alexandra… you can go ahead now”
    1st voice: “Ten four, be alert”
    then “Get out” followed by *warning tone*

    Reply
  5. JonGee February 15, 2017 at 5:28 am

    I disagree, the chain seems to lose momentum. Also, it would be good to see the full video, just to show that when it gets edited at 2:17 he hasn’t just gone and swung the chain himself.

    On the second video, interesting feature at 2:49 on the lower left.

    Some suggest the transcript of the audio of the “radio” is:

    1st voice: “Mine control to Michael, are we clear to detonate?”
    2nd voice:”Alexandra… you can go ahead now”
    1st voice: “Ten four, be alert”
    then “Get out” followed by *warning tone*

    Reply
  6. Anonymous January 3, 2018 at 10:47 pm

    I can’t say for sure what happened, but because I’m a sceptic at heart, I would’ve wanted to know about trains in the area myself, as well as what was happening above ground. But I’m sure this would have been evident as soon as he left the mine as one would be able to view such commotion happening up top. You certainly would be able to see such big and noisy machines. So, I don’t know guys. But I do know that with any type of trauma happening in such places, you’re going to have some form of residual energy, but first and foremost I do exhaustive research before reaching such a conclusion.

    JONGEE, how did you reach your conclusion for what was said during the audible transcript? Truly interested.

    There are no recent accidents being reported or published from what I can tell happening in the Horton Mine in recent years. By recent, I mean 60’s and above. But accidents happen in all mines, fatal and not. This mine I understand was in operation until 1984? I was however able to find a link of archived reports of miners being injured in Lander cty. without the particular mine being listed, and it didn’t say whether the accidents were fatal or not. I found at least 10 that were reported in early 1900’s. Sure, plenty of publications being documented before computers, go figure! There are numerous mines in Lander cty. so I don’t what to take away from it other than the fact that there are accidents!

    Reply

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